Vissza: Újdonságok

Mária Kurdi: Approaches to Irish Theatre through a Hungarian’s Lens: Essays and Review Articles.

PDFNyomtatásÍmél

Ár
2950 Ft
Leírás

Könyvészeti adatok
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ISBN 978 963 429 188 6
Megjelenés: 2018
Nyelv: angol
Terjedelem: 206 o.
Méret: 148,5 x 210 mm
Kötésmód: kartonált, ragasztókötött


Ismertető

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The title emphasizes that the collection reflects one Hungarian scholar’s informed perspectives and scholarly output in the field of Irish theatre, those of the author. This volume contains nine essays and three review articles which the author has written and published in national and international journals and collections since 2000. They are grouped and arranged with regard to their themes and the critical approaches they apply or, in a couple of cases, according to the similarity between the occasions that called them into being, rather than keeping to the chronological order of their inception. Ranging from argumentative to stylistic and also personal reasons, most of the papers have been just recently re-edited, updated or even re-structured to some degree.

            In the first part of the book subtitled Essays, papers 1-4 focus on Irish drama in relation to Hungarian culture, theatre productions and critical reception, tending to use a wider context in which to examine and evaluate authors from modern (e. g. Oscar Wilde) to postmodern (e. g. Martin McDonagh), theatre events, dramaturgies, and responses to the productions. Next, essays 5-6 interrogate a variety of kinships and co-influence of Irish and American dramatists, including Samuel Beckett, Edward Albee and Sam Shepard. In the following group, essays 7-9 address plays by Irish dramatists who belong to the generation born in and after 1970 (McDonagh, Nancy Harris, and Stella Feehily), therefore still relatively young but already well received, established authors. The three pieces which close the volume are arranged under the heading “Review Articles,” which elaborate on an array of international critics’ views on J. M. Synge, Thomas Kilroy and women playwrights.